Jul 052010
 

ISO 80; f/8; 3.2s; 9.9mm; manual focus (Canon XS10 on tripod)

ISO 80; f/8; 3.2s; 9.9mm; manual focus (Canon XS10 on tripod)

ISO 80; f/8; 3.2s; 9.9mm; manual focus (Canon XS10 on tripod)

ISO 80; f/8; 2.0s; 7.7mm (SD950IS in Fireworks mode on mini tripod; no timer)

ISO 80; f/8; 2.0s; 7.7mm (SD950IS in Fireworks mode on mini tripod; no timer)

ISO 80; f/8; 2.0s; 7.7mm (SD950IS in Fireworks mode on mini tripod; no timer)

Our little town managed to do quite the fireworks with a very small budget.  It lasted only 15 minutes, but it was a quality 15.  Moreover, we had great seats with no obstructions.  Basically we parked at the model airplane field, and the fireworks were shot from the nearby field, not even a quarter a mile away.

I brought both cameras. (I should have brought a third camera just to take a picture of my set up!)

I put the SX10 on the tripod, and followed the instructions given to us in our mini-assignment links. I set the camera in  manual mode at f/8 (I have no f/11).0; slow shutter speed (tried 15 secs, but then changed it to 3.2″ because it took so long I was missing the fireworks); and Manual Focus at just under Infinity.  I was most nervous about manual focus since I feel like I always make blurry photos in this mode. I did try the 10-sec self-timer for a while but that was a bit too long to wait … it all became so random as to whether or not I’d get a shot.  Then I realized it really was random and maybe I should have used the time.  But 15 minutes is not enough time to figure out the adjustments.

For the SD950IS, I put it on the mini tripod and set it on a table and tilted the camera up.  I put the camera in Fireworks mode.  I intended to set it up to with the 2-sec self-timer, but apparently forgot in the heat of the moment.

I sat between the two cameras clicking each at different moments… and then sometimes forgetting to click either when there was a “brilliant” one.  Then, missing seeing some fireworks because I was worried about the photos.  Carl enjoyed the whole 15 minutes straight and said it was the best fireworks he’d ever seen. (I tried not to hate him at that moment.) I knew then that he was right and taking photos might not be the best way to “see” the fireworks.

What I learned from this… shorter shutter speed might be in order. Also, to not click when the firework is first shot, but wait until it is in full bloom.  You’ll notice none of these are that perfect moment.

And maybe going with the camera’s fireworks mode might be the best way to both enjoy the show and get some pictures.  Oh, and the timer or remote control would be good.  Ideally the old B for bulb would be best.

  8 Responses to “Mini-Assignment: Low Light/Fireworks”

  1. Well done! You got lots of good shots whilst experimenting with your settings.

  2. You did a great job on the fireworks. I appreciate the time you took to define what you did with each picture. I haven’t even gotten out to see any yet, maybe this weekend. I will be sure to visit your page in preparation.

  3. You got some great shots of fireworks! I like this time of year.

  4. Great job! I like #’s 3, 4 and 5 the best.

  5. These are all wonderful…I love the bright colors and the random designs…very bright and abstract! Cool! I also love the close up of the flag…so nice and clear and beautiful!

  6. I like Nos 3 and 6 most and I think they are all good. Only suggestion for next 4th is get a remote for each camera, then you can shoot and enjoy at the same time

  7. Judi, those are marvelous – from both cameras! Thank you so much for including your settings, too. Now I’ll know how to set up my SX10 for fireworks, too.

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